Learn to Ride The surfing Short Board

Learn to Ride the Surfing Short Board

New students often want to learn to ride the surfing short board. What they don't realize is the amount of technique and practice to get to the point where they are competent and it is fun. 


Learn Everything on the Soft Top First


Moving away from the beginner soft top too soon brings complications. Smaller boards have less volume. They are harder to paddle, have to catch arcing waves, and are more difficult to ride. New techniques are required to ride in the pocket than needed to ride foam waves. 


After learning all the fundamentals and techniques on a soft top, the surfer should only move shorter 6" at a time and should maintain the width and thickness of a bigger board being 2 3/4" thick and 21 + inches wide. 


Positioning for a Real Wave


A foam wave has a long window for positioning and catching the wave. A real wave for short boards has only a few seconds as it arcs. The surfer first sees where waves are breaking often marked by the line up. Then as a wave begins to form, he paddles to get in front so it will rise under the board. 


The surfer wants the wave arcing above his head before he paddles hard three times down the face. As the board begins to drop, he can pop up. The pop up has to be smooth and feet have to land exactly right and the posture be squared to the front of the board. 


Getting into the Wave Pocket


Getting to the pocket to ride can be accomplished a couple of ways. The surfer can go down the face and then bottom turn into the pocket. On steep face waves, the surfer often points the board toward the pocket before popping up eliminating the need for a bottom turn. 


Beginner surfers or on waves that are closing out, go to the corner where the wave forms far away from the apex where the foam first comes over the lip. There the waves are not as steep and you are immediately in the pocket. In the corner, the surfer aims at a 45 degree angle towards the beach and lets the pocket come under the board. 


The short board surfer needs to learn the bottom turn, the cut back, and how to accelerate the board. Accelerating is pushing the nose of the board up and down the pocket with the front foot to get speed. Speed makes all maneuvers easier. 


For Oceanside Surf Lessons, see the Home Page

 

See my Dry Land and in Water Demo video


For surfing fitness and  Personal Training in Oceanside see my site


For Life Style Self-Coaching and my Guide Book see my site 9 Climb




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family Lessons for Beginners

Families Learn Surfing Together

Families learn surfing together in a safe environment for everyone. Lessons take place in shallow water so being a great swimmer is not a necessity. Being comfortable in the ocean is important so little ones should start with boogie boarding. 


The Dry Land Lesson


Lessons begin with a dry land lesson where everyone views the concepts and practices their pop ups. Water safety is foremost so beginners are instructed how  to handle the surfboard in the ocean. The fundamentals of balancing lying down, catching waves, popping up, and riding are introduced before entering the water. 


Everything is different in the ocean so the fundamentals have to be repeated over and over. A lot of new students ride the first wave. If you follow the dry land instructions by learning the count and following the sequence, surfing is easy. 


First Wave Rides


Students are pushed into foam waves at the beginning as they learn the process and how to ride a wave. Soon they are catching their own waves. Once they have learned this process, they are taught how to paddle out and turn around to catch waves. 


Students who advance quickly can try to catch some real waves in between the foam waves. Surfing is all about timing and learning the rhythm and timing makes the process smooth and easy. 


For Oceanside Surf Lessons, see the Home Page

 

See my Dry Land and in Water Demo video


For surfing fitness and  Personal Training in Oceanside see my site


For Life Style Self-Coaching and my Guide Book see my site 9 Climb

 



Families Learn Surfing Together
Families Learn Surfing Together

Beginner Surfers Catch Real Waves

Beginner Surfers Catch Real Waves

Beginner surfers catch real waves after they have mastered techniques on foam waves. Learning to surf requires patience and focus on details. It looks very smooth when seen in the movies but surfing is like a car in that its a composition of lots of moving parts.


Beginners Surfers Start wih the Dry Land


When I teach new students in Oceanside Surf Lessons, we begin with the dry land portion that explains the sequence that has to be followed and the timing to catch foam waves. Most beginners have to learn patience and timing to counter their instincts to rush. 


Following the Sequence for Catching Waves


The sequence for catching a wave and popping up to ride has steps that have to be followed without eliminating any step. The first step for a beginner is getting on the board balanced with their feet at the very back of the surfboard. When they paddle they have to keep the board balanced and get in front of the wave before they move their body. 


Getting in front of the wave means paddling before the foam wave arrives and then paddling hard when it is close and continuing to paddle hard until the surfer feels the board take off.  The nose will come up to plane on the surface in calm water.  Most beginners put their hands on the board as soon as they feel the wave hit and pearl the surfboard.  (push nose underwater)


Once the surfer has caught the wave, they put their hands in a man's push up position and rest for a second. Then the beginner pushes and puts their back foot flat on the board under their butt so they can stand up on it. As they stand, they lift their hands and torso and then move their front foot to the front of the board to hold the nose down. 


Catching Real Waves


Catching real waves is the same process. Start with small real waves that have reformed on the inside after breaking outside. Also try to catch them at the corners away from the origin point called the apex where the foam first comes over the top. 


To catch corners, the surfer paddles along side the wave and at a 45 degree angle towards the beach. They let the pocket come under the board and pop up still at a 45 degree angle to the beach and ride in the pocket instead of straight at the beach.


Once these techniques are learned, the surfer can move to the outside to try for bigger real waves. On a soft top at a beach where waves break steep or close out, the surfer will have to catch the wave and before popping up push the nose toward the pocket to avoid pearling down the face. 


On big waves with a soft top, it might also be good practice to go for the corners where the waves are not as steep and fast. 


For Oceanside Surf Lessons, see the Home Page


 See my Dry Land and in Water Demo video


For surfing fitness and  Personal Training in Oceanside see my site


For Life Style Self-Coaching and my Guide Book see my site 9 Climb




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Learning Surf Fundamentals

Learn 5 Surf Fundamentals

Surf looks very flowing and easy in the movies but it is a compilation of at least 5 surfing fundamentals. I teach students a sequence that they learn better by counting each step out loud in the water and following the steps.


Getting into the Oceans


It the water, new students become preoccupied by the environment and resort to their instincts. Their instincts don't include timing but are all about speed. Beginners without training don't correctly time waves or the time to begin a pop up or the process of the pop up. Then they land on the board incorrectly and frustration is all they find.


Fundamentals begin with lying on the board correctly with the feet at the back and the body balanced over the center line. New surfers want to roll over to catch foam waves 20' before they arrive and start paddling. When the wave is within 5', they paddle hard and after the wave hits the board paddle another 3 or 4 strokes. 


Getting in Front of the Wave


The surfboard must be in front of the wave before they put hands on the board for the pop up. The hands are placed next to the chest in a man's push up position, not on the rails. They are placed on the count "stop" so the surfer comes to a stop before doing the pop up.


On the beginner  pop up the new surfer pushes up on the board and places his back foot under his body so he can stand up on it. As he stands he lifts his hands and torso into an upright position and then moves the front foot toward the nose of the surfboard. The hands are up before the front foot lands on the surfboard. 


The Surfer Posture


The surfer posture is important for the beginner. The feet are shoulder width apart and the hips and shoulders are squared to the front. Weight is equal on front and back leg and the knees are flexed. Both hands should be in front pointing over the nose of the surfboard. 


In the proper posture, the surfboard will go straight to the beach and the surfer doesn't have to do any work. 


For Oceanside Surf Lessons, see the Home Page

 

See my Dry Land and in Water Demo video


For surfing fitness or Personal Training in Oceanside see my site


For Life Style Self-Coaching and my Guide Book see my site 9 Climb

 



Surf Fundamentals
Surf Fundamentals

Oceanside Surf Lessons for Beginners

Oceanside Surf Lessons for Beginners

Oceanside Surf Lessons for Beginners is the perfect spot to learn this great sport or to get re-oriented after not surfing for a year or two. Beginner to advanced surfing is based on simple fundamentals that can be learned in one lesson.


In the First Lesson


In a first lesson, students learn how to position and balance on the surf board to catch a wave, how to catch a wave, how to pop up, and how to ride. Students start with a quick dry land and then get most of the important instructions in the water. 


Surfing starts with correctly rolling over on the surfboard to catch a foam wave. Feet have to be in the back of the board and the body has to be balanced in a straight line equal on both sides of the middle. 


Paddling for Waves


Paddling for waves is timing. When the wave is 20 feet away, the surfer begins to paddle easy looking back to see when the wave will hit the board. Just before the wave hits the board and right after, the surfer paddles hard until the board is in front of the wave. 


The pop up is a sequence of moves and I always have students count out loud for each step to keep focused on their body's movements.  The student has to put their hands on the board, push up while placing their back foot flat and under their body so they can stand on the foot. Then the student stands raising his hands and moves the front foot to the front of board. 


The Correct Board Posture


The resulting posture is important. The body has to be squared to the front so both hands are in front and one shoulder is not trailing like snow boarding. Weight has to be equal on both legs with knees slightly flexed. If the surfer is one the board correctly, it will go straight to the beach with little effort. 


For Oceanside Surf Lessons, see the Home Page

 

See my Dry Land and in Water Demo video


For information on surfing fitness or  Personal Training in Oceanside see my site


For Life Style Self-Coaching and my Guide Book see my site 9 Climb



surf lessons for beginners
surf lessons for beginners